Why is Othello considered a tragedy?

Why is Othello considered a tragedy?

Othello is a tragedy because it tells the story of a noble, principled hero who makes a tragic error of judgment, leading to a devastating climax in which most of the characters end up either dead or seriously wounded.

Is Othello a bad guy?

Othello is the actual villain. Even though he initially lacks any malicious thoughts and ideas, he eventually gets to become a murderer due to emotionally untrustworthy and jealousy.

Who is the true villain in Othello?

Iago is the play’s main antagonist, and Othello’s standard-bearer. He is the husband of Emilia, who is in turn the attendant of Othello’s wife Desdemona. Iago hates Othello and devises a plan to destroy him by making him believe that his wife is having an affair with his lieutenant, Michael Cassio.

Who does Iago try to blame at the end of this scene?

Roderigo

Is Othello a tragic hero according to Aristotle?

“Othello, the Moor of Venice” can be considered as a Shakespeare’s tragedy in which Othello serves as the tragic hero according to Aristotle. Othello is a tragic hero since he is a respected man at the begging enjoying power and honor but later faces downfall when he murders his wife suspecting her of being unfaithful.

Why did Iago want Cassio dead?

Iago wants Cassio dead because he says Cassio has a good character that makes Iago look bad, and if Othello confronts Cassio then his plan will be foiled. Iago feels he will also benefit if Cassio kills Roderigo. Cassio has armor underneath his clothes that saves him from Roderigo when he stabs him.

Who is the hero in Othello?

The play’s protagonist and hero. A Christian Moor and general of the armies of Venice, Othello is an eloquent and physically powerful figure, respected by all those around him.

What is Aristotle’s definition of a tragic hero?

The present study investigates the tragic hero, defined in Aristotle’s Poetics as “an intermediate kind of personage, not pre-eminently virtuous and just” whose misfortune is attributed, not to vice or depravity, but an error of judgment. The hero is fittingly described as good in spite of an infirmity of character.

Is Othello fortunate?

Yet, even as Roderigo portrays Othello as in debt to fortune, in the narrative of his own life, Othello portrays himself as a victim of fortune. He has suffered hardship, endured “battles, sieges, fortunes” (I. iii.